Affiliates

The affiliates program is currently open, on an invitation-only basis, to London-based neuroscientists whose work particularly aligns with that of one or several SWC Group Leaders.

Affiliates are invited to all SWC events, including internal seminars, and have access to the FabLabs and some other core resources. They can host SWC PhD students for lab rotations and act as their joint supervisors for placements, subject to previous experience successfully graduating PhD students. They are also invited to jointly host seminar speakers at the SWC.

There are currently sixteen affiliates from a number of UCL departments and other London universities, who are collaborating with SWC researchers on a wide variety of ideas:

  • Jennifer Bizley (Ear Institute, UCL)

Professor Bizley's research seeks to link the patterns of neural activity in auditory cortex to our perception of the world around us. Making sense of the complex mixture of sound that arrives at our ears is a considerable neurocomputational challenge – and one that cannot yet be solved by machine listening devices. Their research methods combine electrophysiological recordings (from auditory, parietal and frontal cortex) during the performance of complex sensory discrimination tasks, with causal manipulations of neural activity, animal and human psychophysics and computational modelling.

  • Rob Brownstone (Division of Neurosurgery, UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology)

Rob Brownstone, Professor and Head of the Division of Neurosurgery at the UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology, focuses on the study of neural circuits for movement. Using a number of varied approaches, his lab group studies circuits primarily for command (brain stem) and organisation (spinal cord) of movement of the fore and hind limbs. To this end, he collaborates with a number of groups, including that of Andy Murray at the SWC.

  • Neil Burgess (Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, UCL)

Professor Burgess is director of the UCL Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience and a member of the UCL Institute of Neurology. His research interests include the neural mechanisms supporting memory, with particular interest in the role of the hippocampus in spatial and episodic memory, and the role of other brain regions and forms of memory such as phonological working memory.

  • Matteo Carandini (Institute of Ophthalmology, UCL) and Ken Harris (Institute of Neurology, UCL)

Professors Carandini and Harris run a joint lab which aims to understand how the brain processes sensory signals, and integrates them with internal signals to guide decision and action. They wish to understand these processes at the level of large populations of individual neurons and investigate these questions with a combination of experiment and computational analysis. They work mostly in the mouse brain, with techniques such as neuromics, high-count electrodes (Neuropixels), optogenetics, imaging, operant conditioning, and virtual reality simulation. Matteo and Ken collaborate with Yoh Isogai on improved methods for highly multiplexed RNA detection in situ. 

  • Claudia Clopath (Faculty of Engineering, Imperial College London)

Dr Clopath holds an MSc in Physics from the EPFL and did her PhD in Computer Science under Wulfram Gerstner. She did postdoctoral fellowships in neuroscience with Nicolas Brunel at Paris Descartes and in the Center for Theoretical Neuroscience at Columbia University. She is now a Reader (equivalent to Associate Professor) at Imperial College London. She is also a visiting researcher at SWC. Her research interests are in the field of neuroscience, especially insofar as it addresses the questions of learning and memory. She uses mathematical and computational tools to model synaptic plasticity, and to study its functional implications in artificial neural networks. At SWC, she works closely with the experimental neuroscientists, building experimentally-driven theory and proposing theory-driven experiments.

  • Mike Hausser (Wolfson Institute for Biomedical Research, UCL)

Professor Hausser's group is interested in understanding the cellular basis of neural computation in the mammalian brain; specifically, investigating how the integrative properties of neuronal dendrites and the anatomical and functional connectivity of neural circuits contribute to coding and processing of information in the intact brain. 

  • Kate Jeffrey (Department of Psychology and Language Sciences, UCL)

Professor Jeffrey's lab is interested in how neurons encode complex space. They study the activity of single neurons in the hippocampus and in those regions that project to it, in order to understand what environmental information the cells use to form their map of space.

  • Dimitri Kullmanm (Institute of Neurology, UCL)

Professor Kullmann's research addresses how cortical circuits become entrained in health and disease. His laboratory has uncovered dynamical principles underlying gamma oscillations, and uses closed-loop optogenetic manipulation to understand the roles of such oscillations in information propagation in the brain. Epileptic seizures arise from abnormal hypersynchrony of neuronal networks, and other work in the Kullmann lab aims to understand the mechanisms of propagation of seizures and how they can be interrupted both in rodent models and in patients. The lab also uses methods developed by SWC researchers including Neuropixels to follow single units during oscillations and seizures (Kampff) and localized glutamate uncaging to understand mechanisms of dendritic integration by interneurons (Branco).  

  • Jennifer Linden (UCL Ear Institute)

Jennifer Linden is Professor of Neuroscience at the UCL Ear Institute and studies neural mechanisms of normal and abnormal central auditory processing. She received her PhD in Computation & Neural Systems from the California Institute of Technology in 1999, working with Richard Anderson on auditory responses in the lateral intraparietal area in awake behaving macaques. As a postdoctoral fellow with Michael Merzenich and Christoph Schreiner at the University of California in San Francisco, she switched model systems from monkeys to mice, and published the first studies of spectrotemporal receptive field structure in the mouse auditory cortex. She moved to UCL in late 2004, joining the Ear Institute when it opened in 2005. Her research interests include neural representation of complex, temporally varying sounds in the central auditory system, and neural mechanisms of central auditory dysfunction in mouse models of human schizophrenia, tinnitus, and developmental disorders. She has long-standing collaborations and multiple research publications with Prof Maneesh Sahani at the Gatsby Unit and Prof John O'Keefe at the SWC. For further details, see www.ucl.ac.uk/ear/research/lindenlab.

  • Jason Rihel (Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, UCL)

Dr Rihel's lab use zebrafish to investigate why sleep is essential for animals as diverse as flies and humans, and to understand which regulatory genes and neuronal circuits control the timing, amount, and duration of sleep.

  • Andreas Schaefer (Francis Crick Institute / Department of Neuroscience, Physiology and Pharmacology, UCL)

Professor Schaefer studies individual nerve cells in the brain work together to create complex thoughts and actions, by focussing in particular on the olfactory bulb. They construct 'wiring diagrams' for this part of the brain and use genetic engineering techniques and chemicals to modify the genes and molecules inside olfactory nerve cells.

  • Simon Schultz (Department of Bioen, Imperial College London) 

Professor Schultz works on neurotechnology, applying optical and electrophysiological techniques for probing neural circuits to brain circuits subserving vision and memory. He also develops information and theoretical tools for neural data analysis. He shares research interests in neurotechnology for whole brain connectivity mapping with Troy Margrie, and in two-photon imaging of changes in hippocampal circuit properties in mouse models of neurodegenerative disease with John O'Keefe.

  • Angus Silver (Department of Neuroscience, Physiology and Pharmacology, UCL)

Professor Silver is a Wellcome Trust Principal Research Fellow and Professor of Neuroscience in the Department of Neuroscience, Physiology and Pharmacology at UCL. He studies synaptic integration and circuit function in cerebellum and neocortex with in vivo, in vitro and modelling approaches. The lab also develops new tools for imaging and modelling network function including high speed 3D acousto-optic Lens two-photon microscopy, the Open Source Brain platform and NeuroMatic, an electrophysiological acquisition and analysis package. He has collaborations with the Mrsic-Flogel and O’Keefe labs as part of an NIH Brain initiative grant on microscope development and dissemination.

  • Steve Wilson (Department of Anatomy and Developmental Biology, UCL)

Professor Wilson’s group works on the establishment and function of left-right asymmetries in the brain using zebrafish as a model system.   They are addressing how neurons in the left and right habenulae acquire different functional properties and how these asymmetries impact behaviour.  The group has collaborated with Adam Kampff to analyse behaviour in young fish and are keen to develop more collaborative projects.  

  • William Wisden (Department of Life Sciences, Imperial College London)

Professor Wisden studied Natural Sciences at the University of Cambridge, and then did his PhD with Stephen Hunt at the MRC Molecular Neurobiology Unit, Cambridge, followed by a period as a postdoc in Peter Seeburg’s lab at Heidelberg, Germany. He then moved to the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Cambridge as a group leader in the mid 1990s, followed by a return to Heidelberg, then to a Professorship at the University of Aberdeen (Scotland), and finally in 2009 to a Professorship at Imperial College London. William has worked extensively on the molecular biology of neurotransmitters receptors (GABA, AMPA, kainate receptors). More recently he has become interested in the circuitry regulating sleep. In collaboration with Nick Franks at Imperial he has used mouse genetics to investigate sleep-wake circuitry and the actions of sedative drugs. Recently, using activity-tagging methods, they have discovered a hypothalamic circuit linking skin warming and the induction of sleep and the control of body temperature. They have also discovered that neurons in the ventral tegmental area, a region usually studied for its contribution to regulating goal-, and reward-directed and social behaviors, contains GABA and glutamate neurons which strongly regulate sleep and wakefulness. His group are collaborating with Andy Murray, who is developing new circuit mapping techniques which are highly useful for mapping sleep-wake circuitry.